Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, B-Sides

The Best Songs, The Best Life by Terry Barr

To read this piece, click on the album cover below.

About the author:
Terry Barr is the author of the essay collection, Don’t Date Baptists and Other Warnings from My Alabama Mother (Third Lung Press) and the upcoming collection, We Might As Well Eat: How to Survive Tornados, Alabama Football, and Your Southern Family. His work has appeared in Full Grown People, storySouth, The Bitter Southerner, Eyedrum Periodically, Eclectica, and Vol 1 Brooklyn. He blogs at medium.com/@terrybarr, and lives in Greenville, SC, with his family.

Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, B-Sides

I’ve Got a Book of Love by Priyanka Padidam

To read this piece, click on the album cover below.

About the author:
Priyanka Padidam is a student in Massachusetts, but not for much longer. Her writing has appeared in
Transcendence and the Tufts Observer. If there’s one thing she’s good at, it’s making extremely specific
playlists. There are probably more things. Find her on Twitter @djpaprika.

Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, B-Sides

Anthem for Dad by Chloë Moloney

To read this piece, click the album cover below.

About the author:
Chloë Moloney is a writer from Surrey, UK. She has had a short story collection published with Cha​nnillo, and fiction published with Moonchild Magazine, Occulum, Sick Lit Magazine and more. Chloë is also a reviewer for the Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2017 with Ed Fringe Review, and writes biographies for the award-winning news platform ShoutOut UK. Recently, Chloë has written articles for The London Horror Society.

Kevin Recommends: “Grandloves” by Purity Ring

Sometimes you just don’t find a song at the right time. For whatever reason the timing doesn’t work out. You guys might have something else going on that gets in the way of what could be a really great thing for you two. It might be that the song isn’t what you’re traditionally attracted to, so you don’t ever really consider its merit. Maybe you’re already committed to looping another song on the album (lookin’ at you, “Lofticries”). Realistically, though, it’s probably just that the song isn’t what you’re in the mood to listen to at the moment.

But then sometimes circumstances change, and the universe brings you two back together. And you guys…

…well, you guys just vibe.

That’s what happened with me when I heard “Grandloves” the first time. I did not care for it. At all. I’d be listening to Purity Ring’s Shrines, and every time this song rolled up I couldn’t hit skip fast enough. It just didn’t work for me. Not one bit. No vibe whatsoever.

Fast-forward to end-of-summer of last year, roughly five years after the album dropped. I’ve been going through a rough time, kind of at my wits’ end. Trying to get my head back on straight after mentally revisiting dark places I hadn’t been to in years. I’m at work, chilling on Spotify, random songs pumping in my earbuds because I can’t find any song that works. “Grandloves” rolls up in the queue, and, for whatever reason, those opening notes don’t make me start mashing skip this time.

I sit.

And I listen.

And I feel.

And we finally vibe.

Been in a happy and contented relationship with “Grandloves” ever since. Nothing gets me gloom-shimmying around my apartment quite the way this song does.

Love you, bb. Let’s listen to you again.

(Song recommendation by Kevin D. Woodall)

Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, B-Sides

Everything Could Never Be This Real by E. Kristin Anderson

To read this piece, click the album cover below.

About the author:
E. Kristin Anderson is a poet, Starbucks connoisseur, and glitter enthusiast living in Austin, Texas. A Connecticut College graduate with a B.A. in classics, Kristin has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. She is the editor of Come as You Are, an anthology of writing on 90s pop culture (Anomalous Press), and Hysteria: Writing the female body (Sable Books, forthcoming). Her writing has been published worldwide in magazines and anthologies and she is the author of eight chapbooks of poetry including A Guide for the Practical Abductee (Red Bird Chapbooks), Pray Pray Pray: Poems I wrote to Prince in the middle of the night (Porkbelly Press), Fire in the Sky (Grey Book Press), We’re Doing Witchcraft (Hermeneutic Chaos Press), and 17 seventeen XVII (Grey Book Press). Kristin is an editor at Red Paint Hill and was formerly a poetry editor at Found Poetry Review. Once upon a time she worked the night shift at The New Yorker. She now works during daylight as a freelance editor and writing coach. She blogs at EKristinAnderson.com and tweets at @ek_anderson.

Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, B-Sides

The Fool by Dustin Heron

To read this piece, click the album cover below.

About the author:
Dustin Heron is a social worker who works with homeless women in California. He writes short stories in his spare time and likes a bit of magic. He holds an MA and MFA from San Francisco State University and his work has appeared most recently in Porridge, Occulum, Ghost Parachute, and Craft Literary,and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. His first book, Paradise Stories, was published by Small Desk Press.

Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, B-Sides

I Can’t Make You Love Me by Chris Oxley

To read this piece, click on the album cover below.

About the author:
Chris Oxley is an American writer, filmmaker, musician, and twenty year public broadcasting employee. He lives in Charleston, West Virginia and co-founded Holler Presents with Scott McClanahan, where they have published books, produced short films, and released music by their group Holler Boys.

J.S. Recommends: “Goods / Gods” by Hearts Hearts

Photo credit: David Meran

Take a moment to celebrate getting over another day with the purest, finest downbeat Viennese electropop. You’re with me on this, right?

Hearts Hearts is a band of four Austrians and their innumerable samplers. They recorded their first album in a monastery, because the simulation is breaking down and ever more unlikely scenarios are emerging in its wake.

Their second album, Goods / Gods, is upon us. Its namesake single has been, in its brief time since seeing release, a novel and constant playlist addition. Its arrangement is one of swirly arpeggios, pulsing synthesizer bass, discomfiting polyrhythms, and the gauzy falsetto of vocalist David Österle. I am here for all of it. If you’re not, perhaps you’ll reconsider when you witness Rupert Höller’s accompanying video direction. Or are you not interested in surreal images of lanky, Red Squadron-besuited Austrians dancing against monolithic architecture?

Is this too arbitrary? Too clever by half? I would argue that we’re an arbitrary people. We’ve clearly abdicated whatever governs human behaviour to a random word generator that knows only Franz Kafka and Joseph Heller. How else to account for everything? In the spirit of the time, Hearts Hearts has marshalled our same appetite for the unexpected to deliver some truly stellar pop tunes. Listen and feel good about the choices you make.

(Song recommendation by J.S. Robson)

Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, Track 35

On “Caledonia” by Dougie MacLean by Neil Clark

To read this piece, click on the album cover below.

About the author:
Neil Clark is from Edinburgh and took up writing because his parents wanted him to have a reliable back-up plan. His work has been longlisted for the Bath Flash Fiction award and published in various anthologies and online journals. Find him on Twitter @NeilRClark.

Memoir Mixtapes Vol.4, Track 34

Our Song: Reflections on Cat Stevens’ “Father and Son” by Jack Somers

About the author:
Jack Somers’ work has appeared in WhiskeyPaper, Jellyfish Review, The Molotov Cocktail, Literary Orphans, and a number of other publications. He lives in Cleveland with his wife and their three children. You can find him on Twitter @jsomers530 or visit him at www.jacksomerswriter.com.